CASTA′LIA (Kastalia)

. . . the nymph of the Castalian spring at the foot of mount Parnassus. She was regarded as a daughter of Achelous (Paus. x. 8.§ 5), and was believed to have thrown herself into the well when pursued by Apollo. (Lutat. ad Stat. Theb. i. 697.) Others derived the name of the well from one Castalius, who was either a simple mortal, or a son of Apollo and father of Delphis, who came from Crete to Crissa, and there founded the worship of the Delphinian Apollo. (Ilgen, ad Hom. hymn. in Apoll. p. 341.) A third account makes Castalius a son of Delphus and father of Thyia. (Paus. vii. 18. § 6, x. 6. § 2.) Source: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. Alcaeus, Fragment 307 (from Himerius, Orations) (trans. Campbell, Vol. Greek Lyric I) (Greek lyric C6th B.C.) : “Kastalia (Castalia) flows in poetic fashion with waters of silver, and Kephisos (Cephisus) [river of Phokis and Boiotia] rises in flood surging with waves, in imitation of Homer’s Enipeus: for Alkaios is compelled just like Homer to give even water the power to sense the presence of gods.” Pausanias, Description of Greece 10. 8. 9 (trans. Jones) (Greek travelogue C2nd A.D.) : “You reach, on the right of the way [to the sanctuary of Delphoi in Phokis] the water of Kastalia (Castalia), which is sweet to drink and pleasant to bathe in . . .